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Alphabet Games Increase Letter Recognition Skills Hold up signs of different objects, and ask children what beginning, medial, or ending sound they hear. Write the alphabet on the whiteboard, in large letters, and give children a flyswatter. Have them run and smack a letter on the whiteboard when you say it aloud.
A: Most children learn to recognize letters between ages 3 and 4. Typically, children will recognize the letters in their name first. By age 5, most kindergarteners begin to make sound-letter associations, such as knowing that book starts with the letter B. Q: How old should a child be when he or she learns to read?
Read, read, and read. Read nursery rhymes, rhyming books, picture books and chapter books. Notice print in the world around you. Call attention to exit signs, the toothpaste tube, and the Cheerios box. Begin letter learning by helping your child learn the letters of his name. Teach the alphabet letter by letter.
There is NO need to sit your 3 year old down and force feed them letter recognition. Include letters into their everyday play and if they show interest jump on it, but never force it. Read, point out letters on signs, and most of all encourage them to recognize their name and their first initial.
Make a name cube, roll it and spell your name with a game from Toddler Approved. Unscramble the letters to spell your name, as seen on Kids Activities Blog. Hunt for letters of their name on a walk with an idea from NurtureStore. Label rocks with letters of their name and use it to spell, just like Time for Play.
Make names with magnetic letters or bottle caps with letters written on top. Make an autograph book. Make an address book. Tactile Names. Go on a name hunt in the classroom (how many names can you find?) Put children's names and pictures on the word wall. Use clothesline and clip paper letters to the line to make names.
Hold up signs of different objects, and ask children what beginning, medial, or ending sound they hear. Write the alphabet on the whiteboard, in large letters, and give children a flyswatter. During guided reading, play a letter recognition game.
Sure, some children are able to write their names at age 4, but some typically developing children still aren't ready until well into age 5!
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