Convert On Currency Lease For Free

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In short: Yes, you can definitely negotiate a lease price. When it comes to negotiating, leasing is just like buying, and that means that you should feel free to negotiate just as you would when buying a car.
In fact, every lease where buyout is available will specifically include the residual value of the vehicle. But you typically can't negotiate it like you can with other lease terms (although you can try). So less depreciation (or higher residual value) can mean lower monthly payments over the lease term.
The residual value is simply an estimate of the wholesale value of the car at the end of the lease term. They are an expert guess as to what the car will be worth when the lease ends, and they are typically not negotiable.
So when you're shopping for a lease, the first rule of thumb is to look for cars that hold their value better the ones that have high residual values. Residual percentages for 36-month leases tend to hover around 50 percent but can dip into the low 40s or be as high as the mid-60s.
Know Your Numbers. Know What You Want. Get Quotes Ahead of Time. Test-Drive the Dealership (and the Salesperson) Check Dealership Inventory. Go on a Good Day. Bring Backup. Keep Your Phone Out.
Negotiate the interest rate (money factor) on the lease to a level appropriate to current market interest rates. Also, when the lease ends you typically have the right to buy the car at the residual value.
A lease deal with a money factor of less than . 0017 is a good deal. Anything higher, means less of a good deal. Of course, the best lease deals are made with a combination of low lease PRICE, high RESIDUAL value, and low MONEY FACTOR.
To get the best deal, negotiate the cap cost first, as though you intend to purchase the car outright. In fact, don't even mention leasing until you and the dealer agree on a price. Once that's settled, then you can bring up financing options (which include leasing).
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